Skip to content

Why do you want to write?

January 7, 2016

 

 

There are two schools of thought about writing a book and selling it.

Many believe you need to stick your finger in the air, feel the way the wind is blowing and follow that gust of air – no matter where it takes you.

Others believe you should write from the heart. In other words, write what you want to write, rather than what is popular.

I say the latter is always the best course of action. Robert Frost in perhaps his most famous poem, The Road Less Traveled, couldn’t have pounded home this point more clearly.

If you really want to make money and be successful, then perhaps you should go ahead and try to write what you think the reading public wants. And, you may be successful. But do you really want to spend all your time chasing what may well turn out to be an elusive goal?

It can be a grind.

The big question you need to ask yourself is why you want to write. Do you have a craving deep in your heart for self-expression or to drive home a point? When you write about what you most love, desire or need to explore, the words come more easily, bursting forth from your soul.

Isn’t that really what writing should be?

One thing is for sure. Writing a book will be more fun when you put down on paper what you want rather than what you think others want.

And that’s my two cents for the day.

http://www.amazon.com/Write-Darn-Book-Become-Author-ebook/dp/B009TSNY8O/ref=sr_1_15_twi_kin_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1452178976&sr=1-15&keywords=mike+reuther

Advertisements
One Comment
  1. Reblogged this on mreuther.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: